The rule that nobody follows

Words matter. And the words we use will determine whether we will earn business from a prospect, or they will go someplace else.

Confuse you lose. People need to know what you do and how you are going to solve their problem. The first step is to create a message that you and your team will use.

The message needs to answer the questions … what do you do?

Here’s a simple formula:

[What you do] to [what’s the benefit].

Here are some examples of Unique Selling Propositions or one-liners that are simple and effective:

“Video Marketing Campaigns to Grow Your Business”
“Workshops to Help Clarify Your Message”
“Addiction Treatment Center to Help You Beat Addiction and Be Happy Again”

A bad one-liner is product-focused and self-focused. Keep your message customer, and problem/solution focused.

Here’s another formula you can use to help create your Unique Selling Proposition:

You know [problem]? Well, what we do is [solution]. In fact, [proof]

An example using the formula above:

“You know how businesses struggle to get leads and sales? We create marketing campaigns to generate leads and sales. We helped a plumbing business grow 20% this year.”

Get your message right.

Here is a link to our newest guide.

Keep Marketing!

Did You Hire A Total Douche? You Should See What It Cost Them.

Did You Hire A Total Douche? You Should See What It Cost Them.

Have you ever met someone that deserves to get a beatdown? I did last week.

Total douche.

Sorry for the harsh language but that is about the extent of my swearing, so I like to use that word when I can.

Here’s the story.

A friend and business partner of mine needed some help with a client, so I offered to head down to Vegas to explain online marketing to a guy I had never talked to or met.

That was my first mistake.

Twenty seconds on the phone with this guy would have told all.

Picture this…

Our Prince had a shaved head wearing a Cop like uniform packing his Glock. His muscles were all tight because he was probably doing pushups and flexing in front of the mirror a few minutes before we met.

I am not joking.

The meeting was to go over a PPC campaign and show him where his clicks were coming from and what kind of impact Google ads were having on his Marketing.

It didn’t go so hot.

The Douche had taken a crash course on online marketing the day from another agency.

He knew it all and wanted to show us that PPC is a waste to their business and that social media doesn’t work to bring in sales.

Even though, they had 81,000 organic followers on Facebook and some of the best engagement I have seen on a Facebook account.

Get this.

Last month somebody hacked their account and instead of getting it resolved they decided to start a new page. They abandoned the old Facebook page.

Who does that?

The Douche does!

During the meeting, Prince Charming pulled out some analytics sheets to show his traffic and stats, but his tracking was off, and he was not looking at the right stats.

His mind was made up. It was a total waste of everyone’s time. We closed down the PPC campaign.

How does this happen?

This business is legit. They do about 20 Million in revenue and have an excellent product.

The actual business owners put this guy in charge of their online marketing campaign a couple of weeks before.

It’s the perfect example of the Peter Principle. Google it if you don’t know about the concept.

Is this story normal?

Sadly it is.

I can’t tell you how many times businesses put the wrong person in charge of their online marketing campaigns. Or they hire a digital marketing agency that puts interns in charge of their account.

Online marketing takes skills, time, and a bit of luck.

You can’t put Tinkerbell in a war with a Gladiator and expect her to win.

But…

That is precisely what a lot of businesses are doing.

Who’s in charge of your online marketing?

What skills do they have?

What results are you seeing and what results are you tracking?

Did you hire the best?

All great questions to ask yourself.

Here’s a cool video we did talking about this principle.